As I kick start another new business venture in 2017 one decision I face is – how much control do I want to have?  As I contemplate this my copy of the IoD Director magazine arrives with an article by Simon Sinek with advice.

screen-shot-2016-12-28-at-08-49-29Simon delivered one of my all-time favourite TED Talks ‘How great leaders inspire action’ with over 29M views and I have used it myself a number of times when consulting clients to stimulate the brain before getting down to business.

Collaboration and letting go

Simon’s advice is to ‘surrender sole control and collaborate to achieve real growth’. He goes on to talk about give and take and delegation to use other people’s talents. He then switches to discuss that when people are promoted they usually don’t get any training as they move into leadership roles. That is more easily addressed in a big company than a SME, even so Simon’s advice is that senior execs need to invest in their own leadership development if they are to maximise the potential of their people.

I looked for evidence to support Simon’s views and found the report of the Chartered Management Institute click here to read that.

screen-shot-2016-12-28-at-09-15-30From that report this graph (apology for quality) highlights two areas for improvement. Change is hard and the table highlights it as the top organisational activity so that senior managers are ‘on top of their game’.

The ‘out of touch’ is something that Simon commented and that raised a whole bunch of questions in my mind.

Remaining relevant

Switching direction now: The Economist report ‘Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative’ commented: To remain competitive, and to give low- and high-skilled workers alike the best chance of success, economies need to offer training and career-focused education throughout people’s working lives.

That got me wondering if there a link between ‘out of touch’ and ‘lifelong learning’?